Monday, August 17, 2009

GOES-14 produces first full disk infrared image


If you recall from a previous post on this blog, or from other sources, a new GOES satellite was launched into space aboard a Delta IV rocket in late June to help watch Earth's weather from 22,000 miles up. This satellite reached geostationary orbit on July 8 and was named GOES-14. It produced its first full disk (hemispheric) infrared image earlier today, which included a view of Tropical Depressions Ana and Claudette, Hurricane Bill, and Tropical Storm Guillermo in the central Pacific. Check out the photogenic first look at the western hemisphere from GOES-14 above(click for larger image).

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4 comments:

Kevin said...

Eric

You image is dated 17 August and according to the NASA website, GOES-14 took its first full-disc visible image on July 27 at 2 p.m. (EDT).

http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Current/GOES14_firstvis_med090727__G14.gif

MWN/Erik said...

I see your point Kevin, although based on the NOAA website below, Aug. 17th was the first image. I think the 27th is probably correct. One of them is wrong! Still a cool image.

http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Current/UNIgoesIR229_G14.jpg

--Erik, MemphisWeather.net

MWN/Erik said...

Kevin - I figured it out. July 27 was the first visible image. Yesterday was the first infrared image. I clarified the posting. Thanks for helping me see my error!

--Erik, MemphisWeather.net

Kevin said...

Absolutely... Very Cool Images !

Both !!!